Beach House Laundry Makeover- Pt. 1

Even though we’re at the beach, we still need to do laundry. So this weekend we did a laundry room makeover at our beach house in Florence.

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Laundry is behind this door…

Aaaand, here it is – this is the after-before picture. The actual before picture would have shown horrible stinky 1960’s tile and “kustom kabinets”. WOULD HAVE, but we didn’t take one before we scraped the tile bashed the cabinets off the walls.

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Horrible cabinets were on the left over laundry area…

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Painted with odor blocking primer- including the floor

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Large ugly cabinet was to the left of the door. We bashed it off with a sledge hammer. It was most satisfying.

The laundry room had either been abused by pets, or possibly uninvited pets (ie: rodents, evidence of which I found in various areas) and it was super smelly. So, a few weeks ago,  after the tiles were popped up (we used a scraper but they gave us no resistance) we coated the entire room in odor and stain blocking primer- specifically Zinsser B-I-N which is a shellac-based primer. This primer requires either denatured alcohol or ammonia for clean up, so I decided to limit my paint brush use and sacrificed a paint roller (rather than clean it with ammonia.) Once the primer dried the smell was gone. Yay!

So that brings us to THIS weekend which was latex paint and new floors. I decided to spray the room with my paint sprayer, so first we mask.

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And we prepare our person for paint spraying.

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Ready for paint spraying and also uranium handling.

Yes. This is a haz-mat suit. Actually, it’s just a cover-all I bought at Home Depot, but it works great for spraying or any painting. The first time I used the paint sprayer I just wore my “paint clothes” and a baseball hat and my regular prescription glasses. But I soon realized that I couldn’t breath and my entire body was covered in light blue mist. So I sprung for the goggles (which will fit over my glasses) and the respirator mask which filters out paint particles. It’s super uncomfortable, but my eyes and lungs are worth it. SO ARE YOURS.

Here we are post paint:

I was able to spray about 70% of the room then my sprayer malfunctioned. Which is annoying because I had to roll the remaining wall AND I had plans to write a paint sprayer review (which would just be angry right now). At any rate, paint is completed, color is Urban Raincoat, Behr Ultra.

Paint is dry the next day and we start laying the floor. We have Allure vinyl planks in Country Pine. This is a floating floor that connects with sticky pads rather than tongue and groove.

We start at one corner and use paint sticks for spacers since we did not think about buying actual spacers.

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Note the 1950’s fold-up yard stick (a gem found in laundry room cabinets before they were destroyed) that we used for a straight edge. 

The fact that this is a floating floor is important because the subfloor is slightly uneven.

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When we get the end of the first row, we trim the plank the fit. Then the remaining piece of plank starts the next row. This ensures that the planks will be staggered more or less randomly, as opposed to a grid. They are easily trimmed with a razor and straight edge. If you don’t have a straight edge (or say, forgot to bring one from your suburban garage that’s just swollen with tools) you could simply use the 1950’s fold-up yard stick that we found hiding in the skanky old cabinets (pictured above).

Floor is down!

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Allure Vinyl Plank in County Pine – very wood-like.

Final touch is MDF 1″ x 3″ trim molding.

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At this point, my husband retires to the couch and I begin the Ikea shelving project. We’re installing the Algot series of shelving, consisting of permanently affixed wall rails and movable shelves and other accessories.

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Ikea Algot with 15″ shelves and a drying rack

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So we’re done until next time when the washer and dryer arrive and we install the remaining shelving unit. Check back in a few weeks for an update!!

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19 thoughts on “Beach House Laundry Makeover- Pt. 1

  1. […] the beach house laundry room post up at Hammer Down! Go check it […]

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  2. Lori says:

    This is the motivation I need to start my next house project!! I’m even excited for YOUR washer & dryer to arrive.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. My life would be so different had I known there was odor-blocking primer. In two old houses we renovated there were laundry rooms that weren’t heated/air-conditioned that had been home to various animals by the tenants, and the smell never went away. It would recur when it was really hot (or really cold). Painting the floor would have made such a difference! Instead, we sold the house and divorced.

    Does this stuff work on basements? Or do you know of a basement-smell cure?

    Liked by 1 person

    • I know what you mean. In the last 10 years the DIY products have multiplied exponentially and now there is a solution for everything!! So the issue in basements is often water, because it’s so hard to keep water out (as I have recent proof!) You have cure the water issue first. If you have seeping water, use the Drylock Extreme Masonry water proofer on the wet areas. But yes, the BIN is also for use on concrete and masonry and it will work for surfaces.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I am majorly impressed. OK — we have one bathroom in the basement that is a moisture nightmare. It has yet to be re-painted, so I’m going to follow your advice.
        THANK YOU! You may have saved a marriage.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Really?? Great, now I have to start ANOTHER blog where I do home improvement marriage counseling. Other things to check with basement moisture: what’s happening outside? We noticed that when the gutters were clogged the rain overflowed and collected at the base of the house, allowing it to seep in. Also, yard grading– does your yard slope towards your foundation? Let me know how you do!!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yes! Do another blog! This is an incredible idea. Example: Just today, I tried to get my husband to agree to buy a ‘statement’ chandelier to put over the kitchen table. A big one. He wanted either nothing or a smaller one. I explained that big ones are “in.” Besides, the one I want has many open spaces where you can see through, thereby making it appear smaller. He pretended not to understand this. I refused to negotiate. We could have just called you! Plus, you would get over $100/hour! (Marriage counseling + home advice.) Also, you were once toying with the idea of doing a reality show with you guys bickering, etc. Perfect introduction to your counseling/home blog.

        Also, yes our gutters are overflowing and our house is on a very steep vertical grade. Husband’s idea? Chop down all trees around house. Ugh.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hahahah! You are killing me. Please post the pictures of your enormous chandelier and slaughtered trees.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. SammyandSufi says:

    Massive coziness, I love the ALGOT! I got it for my laundry room as well, I just have’t had time to install it yet, your final product will be just awesome, can’t wait to see 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Ginger Groundhog says:

    Oh I want the hazmat suit and goggles, especially need the breathing equipment as I will be single handedly tearing down my asbestos garage. Thankfully time and neglect have taken its toll and it falling down already but I have this daunting rash to look forward to very soon judging by the lean of it. Was quoted £2000 to tear down and remove currently don’t have £200 maybe even £20 so it’s down to me to get busy.
    Ahh the joys of being single 😦

    Liked by 1 person

    • OMG Ginger, I nearly shat a brick when I read that. I am sending you a link on how to protect yourself while handling asbestos.

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      • Ginger Groundhog says:

        Shit a brick no more! The garage is down and all the non-asbestos stuff bagged up and removed. Asbestos is being bagged slowly and labouriously, double bagged, taped, labelled etc Plus you have to pay per bag to dispose of it so will do it monthly.
        It took me two and half day to pull it down manually with a hammer and chisel and there were several bruises, a few cuts, some asbestos exposure where I threw the mask across the garden in a fit of rage, one major wipeout cartoon style (I’d have loved to have seen it) and three nights of the deepest sleep only ambien could imagine. I get a real sense of achievement and accomplishment when I complete something like that. That is after I get over the whiny baby ” why do I have to do everything myself, life is so hard, poor me, send me a knight in shining armour” etc etc.
        Thank you so much for sending me the details of the suit and mask etc, that was very thoughtful of you. Thankfully for once, the British weather proved to be a blessing seeing as how 40 years of rain had not exactly penetrated the asbestos but it was damp enough that it didn’t produce any dust when broken except for a few pieces in the internal walls that did puff dust when broken. Also to rained both a little and a lot when I was breaking it down, further reducing the risk. It was due to the rain that I had my fuck it moment, tearing off the suit and mask because I was steaming hot and the warmth had no way to escape. My brain did a quick death calculation and concluded by the time I get asbestosis or mesothelioma (yes I remember the ads in America by law firms) I’ll be too old to care and well you gotta die of something. I did reinstate the mask later and then spent the evening googling ‘single asbestos exposure’, short term asbestos inhalation’ ‘how long from exposure to death’ ha ha
        Good news is the risks are minuscule from a one time exposure unless you were sucking up great lungfuls and supposedly it makes you cough there and then as it irritates. Note to self, Google ‘ anger management’ since the sweaty temper tantrum.
        So, job done. A MASSIVE tick off the jobs to do and yet another commendable hard days work. It was bloody hard work but I did it and it’s very important that I tell someone how brutally hard it was to complete. You are the only female I know who seems to truly get her hands dirty and can understand just how much work is involved in that two and half days work.
        Thanks again for the links Betty.
        Written from my bead as I don’t have the energy to stand!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hahahaha! You gave me a lovely chuckle this morning! Well you told the right person because I am EXTREMELY PROUD of you, that was an enormous job and lots of work plus the whole “death risk” thing. Bravo! And thank you for taking precautions, they may have been overkill but still.
        I would love to chat about projects anytime, PM me at suburbanbettysouth@gmail.com if you like. I have a CATALOG of dirty DIY deeds that I haven’t included in the blog that will at the very least explain what NOT to do.

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  6. Ginger Groundhog says:

    *task
    Although with asbestos maybe I will get a rash but that would be the least of my worries.

    Liked by 1 person

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